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Saturday, May 26, 2012

Did you know that some conditions, such as myocardial ischemia, can be considered both vascular diseases and heart diseases?

Did you know that Vascular disease is a form of cardiovascular disease primarily affecting the blood vessels?

Did you know that some conditions, such as myocardial ischemia, can be considered both vascular diseases and heart diseases?

Did you know that Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for Vascular disease is a pathological state of large and medium sized muscular arteries and is triggered by endothelial cell dysfunction?

Did you know that Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the number one killer in America?

Did you know that CAD affects over five million Americans each year?



Did you know that there are three major coronary arteries, two on the left side of the heart that share a common trun, and one on the right side of the heart?

Did you know that they all branch off from the aorta near the point where the aorta and left ventricle meet?
• Left main  – main trunk, splits into two branches
• Left anterior descending (LAD) –main artery going down the front of the heart
• Left Circumflex (LCx) –main artery going around the side or back of the heart
• Right coronary artery (RCA) – main artery going to the bottom of the heart

Did you know that these arteries and their branches supply all areas of the heart muscle with blood?
Did you know that Coronary artery disease is a narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries?  It is a gradual process caused by fatty substances in the blood sticking to the inner walls of the arteries .  
When the fatty matter starts to build up, the inner diameter of the artery becomes narrow and blood cannot flow as well as it should. 
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When the blood flow is slowed, the heart doesn't get enough oxygen and nutrients. This usually results in chest pain called angina. When one or more of the coronary arteries are completely blocked, the result is a heart attack (injury to the heart muscle).

Did you know what causes the coronary arteries to narrow?
Coronary arteries become narrowed or clogged by plaque build-up in the artery walls. Plaque is made of excessive cholesterol and other substances, such as inflammatory cells, proteins and calcium, that are present in your blood. Over time, the inside of the arteries develop plaques of different sizes. Many of the plaque deposits are hard on the outside and soft on the inside. The hard surface can crack or tear, exposing the soft, fatty inside. When this happens, platelets (disc-shaped particles in the blood that aid clotting) come to the area, and blood clots form around the plaque. The artery narrows further and, in turn, decreases the area for blood to flow through the arteries. Plaque build-up in the arteries is called atherosclerosis (atha-row-skla-row-sis), also known as "hardening of the arteries."
Did you know that process of coronary artery disease?
• Your coronary arteries are shaped like hollow tubes. Inside, they are smooth and elastic, allowing blood to flow freely.

• Coronary artery disease starts when you are very young. Before your teen years, fatty deposits start streaking the blood vessel walls.
• As you get older, the fatty matter builds up. This causes slight injury to your blood vessel walls. In an attempt to heal itself, the cells release chemicals that make the walls stickier. Other substances floating through your bloodstream start sticking to the vessel walls, such as inflammatory cells, proteins and calcium. The fat and other substances combine to form a material called plaque or atherosclerosis. The plaque builds up and narrows the artery.
• A condition called ischemia occurs. This is when the heart muscle becomes starved for oxygen because it’s not getting enough blood. It happens most often at times of peak exertion, like during exercise or stress. When ischemia occurs, you begin to have symptoms (such as angina). When ischemia lasts less than 10 minutes, there is no permanent damage to your heart. You may be told you have "stable coronary artery disease."
• Over time, the inside of the arteries develop plaques of different sizes. Many of the plaque deposits are hard on the outside and soft and mushy on the inside.
• The hard surface can crack or tear, exposing the soft, fatty inside. When this happens, platelets (disc-shaped particles in the blood that aid clotting) come to the area, and blood clots form around the plaque. The artery narrows further.
• Sometimes, the blood clot breaks apart by itself, and blood supply is restored.
• The blocked vessel may develop a collateral circulation: small capillary-like branches of the artery that form over time in response to narrowed coronary arteries. The collaterals "bypass" the area of narrowing and help to restore blood flow. However, during times of increased exertion, the collaterals may not be able to supply enough oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle.
• In other cases, the blood clot may totally block the blood supply to the heart muscle, called a coronary thrombus or coronary occlusion - causing an acute coronary syndrome.
Did you know that the most common symptom of coronary artery disease is angina or "angina pectoris" - also known as  chest discomfort?

Did you know that Angina can be described as?
• Discomfort
• Heaviness
• Pressure
• Aching
• Burning
• Fullness
• Squeezing
• painful feeling
• It can be mistaken for indigestion.
Did you know that Angina is a symptom of a condition called myocardial ischemia?





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